Latin GCSE

The Latin GCSE is suitable both for complete beginners and for those who would like to improve their Latin.

 

The course provides comprehensive GCSE material that expertly builds and expands the learner’s knowledge and ability. As the course is delivered via narrated PowerPoints, learners also have the benefit of hearing Latin spoken.

 

Sulis Learning offers the OCR Latin qualification which consists of three components.

Component 1: Language

The first component (50% of the final mark of the exam) is devoted to studying the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of the language.

 

Each session covering this component will be devoted to a topic. Explanations and examples will be given for the topic, as well as reading from the accompanying textbook.

 

The learner will then the opportunity to practice their understanding through exercises. These will consist of either translation sentences (from Latin to English or vice versa) or longer unseen passages (Latin to English). the latter will increase in frequency towards the end of the course, as these types of passages form the basis of the Language examination paper.

 

At the end of the section on Language, there will be advice on revision, how to tackle the examination paper and mark schemes. Also, links to candidate exemplars importantly help the learner understand what the examiners wish to see in order to achieve the highest grades.

 

Component 2: Prose and Verse Literature

The second section (worth 25%) has a series of options that can be taken, either the study of selections of prose or poetry.

 

This course offers the Prose B option, based on material from the Cambridge Latin Anthology (available to access online). This focuses around two texts, one from a writer from the second century AD, the other from two centuries earlier.

 

Texts for 2024 exams

 

sagae Thessalae

lines 1–96, (iuvenis … obtexi)

 

personae non gratae

Pythius

 

The first is by the north African writer Apuleius and is a passage from the only extant Roman novel, the Metamorphoses, also known as The Golden Ass. It relates the adventures of Lucius, who experiments with magic and is accidentally transformed into a donkey. 

 

The text has been modified to suit the linguistic level of the GCSE candidate but cannot be tackled until completion of the Language module. The learner will be able to translate the text and be able to identify linguistic and literary features used by Apuleius to create emotional effects in the reader. The text is roughly 100 lines long.

 

The second text is much shorter and consists of a short anecdote about an unscrupulous character, from the pen of the orator and politician, Cicero.

 

At the end of the module, the learner will again be able to practice their knowledge with a mock examination paper.

 

Texts for the 2025 and 2026 exams

 

Cambridge Latin Anthology

 

Messalina Adultery.

Messalina is denounced, the death of Messalina

 

avunculus meus

A day in the life of Pliny the Elder

 

The first text is from the historian Tacitus, writing about the scandals, crimes and eventual downfall of the Emperor Claudius’ third wife, Messalina.

 

The second text is an account by Pliny the Younger of the daily working habits of his uncle, Pliny the Elder.

 

At the end of the module, the learner will be able to practice their knowledge with a mock examination paper.

Component 3: Literature and Culture

The third section is a non-language paper based around the study of Roman culture and is worth 25% of the final mark. This is based around two topics, which change every few years.

 

The learner will be expected to study material based around a series of ancient sources, such as site maps, architectural drawings, texts and material culture.

 

Topics for exams in 2024

 

The Romans in Britain

Entertainment

 

Topics for exams in 2025 and 2026

 

Entertainment 

Myths and Beliefs

 
Latin GCSE (OCR) specification can be viewed here

 

‘Why study Latin?’ – read Guardian article here

For exams in 2024:

Prose and Verse Literature

 

Cambridge Latin Anthology

 

sagae Thessalae

lines 1–96, (iuvenis … obtexi)

 

personae non gratae

Pythius

 

Literature and Culture

 

Romans in Britain

Entertainment

For exams in 2025 and 2026:

Prose and Verse Literature

 

Cambridge Latin Anthology

 

Messalina

Adultery, Messalina is denounced, the death of Messalina

 

avunculus meus

A day in the life of Pliny the Elder

 

Literature and Culture

 

Entertainment

Myths and Beliefs

 

Latin GCSE at a glance

The course consists of 3 components:

 

Component 1: Language 

Component 2: Prose and Verse Literature

Component 3: Literature and Culture

 

Important information

Please note: the content for Components 2 and 3 changes every 2 years.

 

When you purchase the course and login, you will find the content for 2024, 2025 and 2026 exams listed clearly in the course menu.

 

If you are planning to sit the exams*, you follow the sections for the relevant year.

 

*Some students follow the courses to improve their language skills but do not plan to sit the exams.

Sulis Learning offers the OCR Latin qualification which consists of three components.

Component 1: Language

The first component (50% of the final mark of the exam) is devoted to studying the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of the language.

 

Each session covering this component will be devoted to a topic. Explanations and examples will be given for the topic, as well as reading from the accompanying textbook.

 

The learner will then the opportunity to practice their understanding through exercises. These will consist of either translation sentences (from Latin to English or vice versa) or longer unseen passages (Latin to English). the latter will increase in frequency towards the end of the course, as these types of passages form the basis of the Language examination paper.

 

At the end of the section on Language, there will be advice on revision, how to tackle the examination paper and mark schemes. Also, links to candidate exemplars importantly help the learner understand what the examiners wish to see in order to achieve the highest grades.

 

Component 2: Prose and Verse Literature

The second section (worth 25%) has a series of options that can be taken, either the study of selections of prose or poetry.

 

This course offers the Prose B option, based on material from the Cambridge Latin Anthology (available to access online). This focuses around two texts, one from a writer from the second century AD, the other from two centuries earlier.

 

Texts for 2024 exams

 

sagae Thessalae

lines 1–96, (iuvenis … obtexi)

 

personae non gratae

Pythius

 

The first is by the north African writer Apuleius and is a passage from the only extant Roman novel, the Metamorphoses, also known as The Golden Ass. It relates the adventures of Lucius, who experiments with magic and is accidentally transformed into a donkey. 

 

The text has been modified to suit the linguistic level of the GCSE candidate but cannot be tackled until completion of the Language module. The learner will be able to translate the text and be able to identify linguistic and literary features used by Apuleius to create emotional effects in the reader. The text is roughly 100 lines long.

 

The second text is much shorter and consists of a short anecdote about an unscrupulous character, from the pen of the orator and politician, Cicero.

 

At the end of the module, the learner will again be able to practice their knowledge with a mock examination paper.

 

Texts for the 2025 and 2026 exams

 

Cambridge Latin Anthology

 

Messalina Adultery.

Messalina is denounced, the death of Messalina

 

avunculus meus

A day in the life of Pliny the Elder

 

The first text is from the historian Tacitus, writing about the scandals, crimes and eventual downfall of the Emperor Claudius’ third wife, Messalina.

 

The second text is an account by Pliny the Younger of the daily working habits of his uncle, Pliny the Elder.

 

At the end of the module, the learner will be able to practice their knowledge with a mock examination paper.

Component 3: Literature and Culture

The third section is a non-language paper based around the study of Roman culture and is worth 25% of the final mark. This is based around two topics, which change every few years.

 

The learner will be expected to study material based around a series of ancient sources, such as site maps, architectural drawings, texts and material culture.

 

Topics for exams in 2024

 

The Romans in Britain

Entertainment

 

Topics for exams in 2025 and 2026

 

Entertainment 

Myths and Beliefs

 

For exams in 2024:

Prose and Verse Literature

 

Cambridge Latin Anthology

 

sagae Thessalae

lines 1–96, (iuvenis … obtexi)

 

personae non gratae

Pythius

 

Literature and Culture

 

Romans in Britain

Entertainment

For exams in 2025 and 2026

Prose and Verse Literature

 

Cambridge Latin Anthology

 

Messalina

Adultery, Messalina is denounced, the death of Messalina

 

avunculus meus

A day in the life of Pliny the Elder

 

Literature and Culture

 

Entertainment

Myths and Beliefs

 
Latin GCSE (OCR) specification can be viewed here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Why study Latin?’ – read Guardian article here

Literature and Culture topics

The Romans in Britain:

 
Roman Army 

Camp layout, life in camp including training. 

 

Roman Roads 

Construction, principal routes across Britain. 

 

Roman Villas 

Villa buildings, the villa estate. 

 

Roman Bath 

Layout of the bath complex, links with religion.

Literature and Culture topics

The Romans in Britain:

 
Roman Army 

Camp layout, life in camp including training. 

 

Roman Roads 

Construction, principal routes across Britain. 

 

Roman Villas 

Villa buildings, the villa estate. 

 

Roman Bath 

Layout of the bath complex, links with religion.

Myths and Beliefs

Roman Gods

 

Jupiter, Juno, Mars, Venus, Neptune, Minerva, Apollo, Diana, Vulcan, Vesta, Pluto, Mercury and their roles.

In Pompeii, the Colosseum, types of Gladiators.

 

State Religion

Temple of Jupiter in Pompeii, sacrifices.

 

Beliefs in the after-life

Tombs in Pompeii, beliefs about life after death.

 

Aeneas, Romulus and Remus

The exile from Troy, visit to the underworld, Romulus and Remus found Rome.

 

Myths and Beliefs

 
Roman Gods

Jupiter, Juno, Mars, Venus, Neptune, Minerva, Apollo, Diana, Vulcan, Vesta, Pluto, Mercury and their roles.

In Pompeii, the Colosseum, types of Gladiators.

 

State Religion

Temple of Jupiter in Pompeii, sacrifices.

 

Beliefs in the after-life

Tombs in Pompeii, beliefs about life after death.

 

Aeneas, Romulus and Remus

The exile from Troy, visit to the underworld, Romulus and Remus found Rome.

Entertainment

 
The Amphitheatre 

In Pompeii, the Colosseum, types of Gladiators.

 

The Theatre at Pompeii 

Scenery and props, actors, plays. 

 

The Circus Maximus and Chariot Racing 

The structure, charioteers and races. 

 

Dinner parties 

The triclinium, entertainment at dinner. 

Entertainment

 
The Amphitheatre 

In Pompeii, the Colosseum, types of Gladiators.

 

The Theatre at Pompeii 

Scenery and props, actors, plays. 

 

The Circus Maximus and Chariot Racing 

The structure, charioteers and races. 

 

Dinner parties 

The triclinium, entertainment at dinner. 

Reasons to study Latin

Improve and strengthen literacy skills in English

Makes it easier to learn another language

Leads to the discovery of the ancient world

Deeper and better understanding of our modern world through the insights of the ancient world

Can prepare young people for a career in the scientific, legal medical professions (also beneficial for adults considering a change of career)

Develops the transferable skill of decoding to the world of computer programming

Is advantageous when applying for jobs and university applications – employers and universities value the skills of critical and analytical thought required in the study of Latin

Latin GCSE at a glance

The course consists of 3 components:

 

Component 1: Language 

Component 2: Prose and Verse Literature

Component 3: Literature and Culture

 

Important information

Please note: the content for Components 2 and 3 changes every 2 years.

 

The content for the different years is clearly listed in the course menu.

 

Students who are planning to sit the exams*, select the clearly labelled sections for the relevant year.

 

*Some students follow the courses to improve their language skills but do not plan to sit the exams.

FAQs

Access to the course for 12 months is £119. Access to the course for 24 months is £149.  

To purchase the 12 months access click here. To purchase the 24 month course click here. You then need to click on the ‘Add to basket’ button and follow the instructions on the payment page.

Yes, it is possible to pay via 5 monthly instalments:

12 month access: 5 monthly instalments of £25.80 (final total: £129)

24 months access: 5 monthly instalments of £31 (final total: £155

These options are available via the product purchase page below and also here

Yes. You will need to purchase the following textbook: Essential GCSE Latin by John Taylor, Bloomsbury. This is available from online retailers or you could contact your local bookshop.

 

The course fee does not include individual tutor support. Our courses provide exceptional, comprehensive material at an affordable cost. There are distance learning providers who offer tutor support and their fees reflect this. The support is usually via email.

 

Students following our courses benefit from the expertise of our course contributors. Dr Beer, for example, has contributed material for the current A Level Classical Civilisation syllabus and brings a wealth of teaching experience to the creation of our Classics courses.

 

As students progress through our courses they are able to check their understanding with study tasks, questions (and answers). It is also possible for students to revisit the sessions as often as required, allowing plenty of time to absorb and reflect on the material.

 

We consider our courses to be excellent value and hope you will too.

We offer this choice to provide flexibility. The length of time you need to cover the material depends on many factors such as work commitments, other courses, holidays, past times and previous knowledge of the subject. 

 

A GCSE takes an approximately 100 to 140 hours to complete. An A Level takes approximately 350 hours.

 

We suggest planning a realistic timetable of how many hours (maybe commit to certain days and times) per week you can spend on the course, allowing for other time commitments. If you are taking the exams (some students follow the courses just out of interest) you will need to allow time for revision.

Do get in touch if you have any further questions. We endeavour to answer questions promptly and you should receive a reply within 24 hours, often sooner.

Our email is info@sulislearning.co.uk. Or you can click on Contact Us. You may also find answers to your questions under FAQs.

Instalment option

How learning latin could change your life

Article from the Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford
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